Patent Law and Supplements

Almost 75% of U.S. clinical trials in medicine are paid for by private companies.  In the drug industry, these private companies are largely pharmaceutical companies.  However, because natural supplements are harder to patent, we see a paucity of clinical trials/studies of natural products compared to pharmaceutical drugs. (Big pharma doesn’t want to pump money into research of a product they can’t potentially “own” via patent).

This is a double-edged sword—-while the consumer has  easier access to supplements, they are often 1. more expensive for out-of-pocket costs (western medicine skepticism and clinical based medicine make insurance coverage sparse, if not completely non-existent, for supplements) and 2. more unpredictable in best mode of use and results achieved.

Thoughts on how to balance the incentive to invest in patentable drugs versus investing in natural (non-patentable) products that harness many health benefits?
How to increase funding for research on recreational drugs that show promising results as therapeutic modalities (e.g. MDMA (“molly”) for treating post-traumatic stress disorder)?

Also check out this article on “Regulating Supplements”…via Regulating Supplements.

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About Erin Umberg

Erin Umberg was born in Vicenza, Italy to parents Thomas Umberg and Robin Umberg. In 2001, she received a Congressional nomination to attend the United States Military Academy at West Point. She was medically discharged in 2003 after being diagnosed with Lupus. She was ranked First in the class and received the Star Wreath Award. After West Point, Erin attended Stanford University where she majored in Human Biology, with a concentration in Neuroscience. She continued at Stanford for graduate school and then worked at Stanford School of Medicine in Pediatric Neurology. In 2009, Erin returned to study the brain at Tufts University on a Provost's Scholars Fellowship. She entered the PhD program for Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology and studied the dopaminergic pathways involved in addiction and obesity. She co-authored a chapter in the textbook Diet, Brain, & Behavior, "The Reward Deficiency Hypothesis." She has also been published in the scientific journal, Physiology and Behavior, for her article: "The Neurobiology of Aversive States," in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, for her article:"From disordered eating to addiction: the 'food' drug," and at the Neural Control of Movement Conference Session for "Uninhibited muscle activity in children with primary dystonia." After graduate school, Erin taught at Santiago Community College and served as Assistant Director for the Newkirk Center for Science & Society at University of California, Irvine. She created a nationally attended conference series, "Post 9/11: Science, Policy & Law" which covered topics of Interrogations & False Confessions, Security Challenges for the 21st Century, and Legal Implications for Civil Liberties. Erin Umberg is currently attending law school at UC Berkeley (Boalt) and is focusing on Intellectual Property Law. She is also interested in civil rights within the criminal justice system. In law school, Erin worked with the Anti-Defamation League to research civil rights issues and is currently a Research Fellow with the California Constitution Center. ********************************************************************************************************************* >>>THIS BLOG IS PARTY OF A THIRD-PARTY SEO SOCIAL EXPERIMENT<<<

Posted on February 17, 2015, in Erin Umberg and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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